From the Studio: Team collaborates in Fusion 360 to create handle for Ember

by Sam Hobish - Feb 2, 2016 9:50:29 AM

Using Fusion 360, teams from Minneapolis, Boston and San Diego designed a handle that attaches to the top of the Ember printer, making it easier to transport. Essential to the design of this handle were the collaborative tools in Fusion, which allowed designers to easily share and modify their iterations across the team. The teams used a combination of T-Splines, direct editing and parametric modeling to create a simple and effective solution for taking Ember on the go.

From the Lab: Fine-Tuning the Dimensional Accuracy of Ember Prints

by Sam Hobish - Jan 29, 2016 2:20:17 PM

Ember is a printer for individuals and businesses that require the utmost precision in their parts. As such, we have created a way that allows Ember users to make exact adjustments to their machine’s image scaling. This ensures that the parts created on Ember are sized exactly as intended. 

Modeling Supports Before Print Studio

by Sam Hobish - Jan 22, 2016 3:26:14 PM

With the Super Bowl coming to the Bay Area in a few weeks, I decided to model a coin to print on Ember. (For you non-sports fans, commemorative coins are flipped at the beginning of games to determine who starts with the ball).  Eventually, I’ll have it investment casted, but for now, I want to demonstrate the technique I used for supporting my model.

Wacom artists use Ember to bring characters to life at CES

by Sam Hobish - Jan 12, 2016 1:37:52 PM

I just returned from CES in Las Vegas where I spent three days working with artists who used Wacom tablets and displays to design models to print on Ember. Observing the designers work enlightened me to new workflows for producing 3D models, especially in the creation of sculpted parts. Through a combination of software like Sketchbook Pro, Maya and Mudbox, designers like Craig Barr modeled lifelike characters with a degree of detail that made Ember the perfect machine to bring them to life.

Introducing CMYK + W Resin

by Sam Hobish - Dec 14, 2015 1:13:00 PM

CMYK + W resins for the Ember 3D Printer are now available, giving you the ability to mix and match resins to customize your color palette. 

Ember 3D printer news from AU

by Kimberley Losey - Dec 2, 2015 10:52:53 AM

We are here at Autodesk University 2015 sharing the latest Ember printer news. It was at this time last year the Ember Explorer program was announced and we began taking orders for the first 3D printing packages. This year, we are here with some new news.

Support Generation for Jewelry Part 2

by Pierre Lin - Nov 23, 2015 8:00:00 AM

 In this blog post, we’re going to look at how to use Print Studio to generate supports and walk through two examples of generating supports for rings.

Support Generation for Jewelry Part 1

by Pierre Lin - Nov 18, 2015 8:00:00 AM

 In this blog post, we’re going to explore best practices for designing supports for jewelry pieces, but first I’d like to briefly explain what supports are and why they’re so important.

Designing Jewelry with Fusion 360 and Ember

by Sam Hobish - Nov 11, 2015 10:11:00 AM

3D printing is more than simply operating the machine.  What’s often overlooked is the rigorous process of ideation, designing, prototyping and refining of the product that eventually emerges from the printer.  Using Autodesk Print Studio, which is embedded in our pro-apps, like Fusion 360, we are have simplified the workflow to Spark-compatible printers like Ember.  In this video, we see how a pendant - designed by Carl Bass, Autodesk’s CEO with Arthur Harsuvanakit – went from a CAD model in Fusion 360 to a beautiful piece cast in sterling silver.

MJSA ConFab Recap

by Sam Hobish - Oct 22, 2015 1:34:40 PM

I had the fortune of attending the MJSA ConFab conference at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in New York City last weekend. I brought an Ember to show the jewelry designers in attendance how 3D printing streamlines the design-to-manufacturing process and enables the creation of extremely complex geometries that are otherwise difficult to achieve with traditional modeling techniques.