G&R Labs Creates UV Light Meter for Ember

by Owen Smithyman - Sep 10, 2016 9:30:00 AM

The foundation of any stereolithography (SLA) 3D printer is its light source. Ember builds 3D models layer by layer by exposing light-sensitive resin to ultraviolet light from a DLP projector. Understanding how the projector’s light affects your prints and calibrating the projector to provide the proper light dosage are essential to mastering 3D printing with Ember or any DLP machine.

Preparing for the Arrival of Your Ember

by Shalom Ormsby - Apr 19, 2016 2:56:00 PM

Once you've ordered your Ember, it's time to make preparations for its arrival so that you'll be able to start printing safely and effectively when your boxes arrive. This includes choosing and setting up a suitable workspace, setting up waste disposal, buying supplies, installing the software, and learning how to use Ember. 

Announcing High Speed Printing on Ember

by Sam Hobish - Mar 9, 2016 9:41:50 AM

Last week, we invited members of the media and the greater Autodesk community to check out some experiments we've been working on in the Ember lab.  

From the Road: UCLA students use Python to generate architectural structures printed on Ember

by Sam Hobish - Feb 19, 2016 10:47:40 AM

During a yearlong studio lead by Professor Guvenc Ozel, students at UCLA used Python scripts to generate complex architectural structures and printed them on Ember.  After exploring numerous additive processes, the students were able to finally bring the - otherwise difficult to print - creations to life with Ember. 

From the Studio: Team collaborates in Fusion 360 to create handle for Ember

by Sam Hobish - Feb 2, 2016 9:50:29 AM

Using Fusion 360, teams from Minneapolis, Boston and San Diego designed a handle that attaches to the top of the Ember printer, making it easier to transport. Essential to the design of this handle were the collaborative tools in Fusion, which allowed designers to easily share and modify their iterations across the team. The teams used a combination of T-Splines, direct editing and parametric modeling to create a simple and effective solution for taking Ember on the go.

From the Lab: Fine-Tuning the Dimensional Accuracy of Ember Prints

by Sam Hobish - Jan 29, 2016 2:20:17 PM

Ember is a printer for individuals and businesses that require the utmost precision in their parts. As such, we have created a way that allows Ember users to make exact adjustments to their machine’s image scaling. This ensures that the parts created on Ember are sized exactly as intended. 

Modeling Supports Before Print Studio

by Sam Hobish - Jan 22, 2016 3:26:14 PM

With the Super Bowl coming to the Bay Area in a few weeks, I decided to model a coin to print on Ember. (For you non-sports fans, commemorative coins are flipped at the beginning of games to determine who starts with the ball).  Eventually, I’ll have it investment casted, but for now, I want to demonstrate the technique I used for supporting my model.

Wacom artists use Ember to bring characters to life at CES

by Sam Hobish - Jan 12, 2016 1:37:52 PM

I just returned from CES in Las Vegas where I spent three days working with artists who used Wacom tablets and displays to design models to print on Ember. Observing the designers work enlightened me to new workflows for producing 3D models, especially in the creation of sculpted parts. Through a combination of software like Sketchbook Pro, Maya and Mudbox, designers like Craig Barr modeled lifelike characters with a degree of detail that made Ember the perfect machine to bring them to life.

Introducing CMYK + W Resin

by Sam Hobish - Dec 14, 2015 1:13:00 PM

CMYK + W resins for the Ember 3D Printer are now available, giving you the ability to mix and match resins to customize your color palette. 

Ember's Electronics and Firmware are now Open Source

by Eric Wilhelm - Sep 21, 2015 4:36:00 AM

Today, we're taking the third step in sharing Ember. Ember's electronics and firmware are now open-source and are available for you to download, inspect, modify, and make improvements. The electronics are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license, the same license under which we've shared Ember's resin and mechanical designs; the firmware is licensed under GNU GPL (see the source code itself for the full details).

 

Most of Ember’s electronic components are located on two PCBs. The main board integrates a clone of the BeagleBone Black and an AVR-based motor controller. The major changes from a stock BeagleBone are the addition of a USB hub (to support the included WiFi adapter), double the flash memory (8GB), and improved power management. A satellite board in the front panel controls its OLED display and ring of LEDs using a second AVR. The Sitara and the AVRs communicate via I2C.

 

  Download the Electronics

 

 

The electronics are available here in three different packages for each of the four boards:

1) the design files

2) the schematics and PCBs

3) the bill of materials, approved vendor lists, and assembly drawings

Ember runs custom firmware in the main (Sitara) processor as well as in the AVR controllers for the front panel displays and the motors that drive the build head and resin tray. The architecture of the Sitara firmware is shown below.

The print engine controls the printing process by sending commands to the motors and slice images to the projector. It uses a hierarchical state machine and reports state changes to an event handler that notifies UI components to update their screens. The event handler also responds to user input (button presses and commands), and motor and timer events, by notifying the print engine to make the appropriate state changes. The web client sends status to emberprinter.com and accepts commands from it. A web server provides an interface for desktop applications using a USB or network connection.

Download the Firmware

Fully opening the design of a precision tool as complicated as Ember is uncharted territory for us. And, we know this isn’t necessarily easy - Ember’s main electronics are a 6-layer board and the design files are in the format of a professional tool. While it might also be difficult to run the firmware without direct access to Ember itself, we have provided a link to the SD card image that could be used on a stock Beaglebone Black for development. However difficult it might be to come along, we hope you’ll recognize our commitment to an open platform and commitment to making the entire field of additive manufacturing better.